YouTube demonetizes anti-vaccination channels

What you need to know about YouTube’s pedophile problem

But after a fair amount of time, and much industry hand-wringing over brand safety (some companies have even established permanent chief brand safety officer positions), most advertisers eventually made their way back to YouTube.

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Facebook and Google have been under mounting pressure to deal with the volume of conspiracy theory and misinformation content on vaccinations.

YouTube will no longer monetize content that promotes anti-vaccinations.

Nestle, the owner of brands like Kit-Kat and Nespresso, chose to "pause" its advertising on YouTube after some of its ads were shown on videos "where inappropriate comments were being made", a company spokesperson said.

To keep advertisers happy, YouTube could increasingly emphasize its progress on more strict enforcement of its policies in comments, demonstrating that its content moderation commitments go beyond video alone.

Hasbro said it was "pausing all advertising on YouTube, and has reached out to Google/YouTube to understand what actions they are taking to address this issue and prevent such content from appearing on their platform in the future". However, at least a few channels were able to monetise, in violation of this policy, according to BuzzFeed News.

Nestle, Disney, AT&T, Hasbro and the creator of Fortnite have all reportedly pulled advertisements from Youtube following allegations of child abuse content being on the platform. There's overwhelming scientific and medical evidence that childhood vaccinations are both safe and effective at curbing disease outbreaks. That includes videos promoting bogus miracle cures for serious illnesses, claiming the Earth is flat, or making "blatantly false claims" about historical events like the 9/11 terrorist attacks, according to YouTube.

Some of the videos have garnered so many views that they are potentially putting children at risk.

YouTube hasn't released an official statement as of publishing this article.

The crisis this time started when a video blogger showed how predators were finding otherwise innocuous videos of young girls and using comments to flag parts of the videos showing activities that could be twisted to be construed as sexual.

Of course, YouTube isn't the only internet company accused of providing a megaphone for crackpot ideas. Pinterest, meanwhile, blocked searches for anti-vaccine content from its service earlier this week.

The crisis snowballed last week as a litany of advertisers suspended their adverts on YouTube, fearing that their carefully-crafted brands would be associated with the repulsive videos and comments.

A spokesman for Vitacost, a vitamin supplement company, told Buzzfeed it had pulled its advertising from YouTube after its presence on anti-vaccination videos was brought to their attention.

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