Indonesia’s Lion Air Says It’s Lost Contact With Airplane

Indonesia: Passenger Plane Flight JT610 From Jakarta Crashes 13 Minutes After Take-off

The flight, which was carrying 188 passengers including children, crashed into the Java Sea. Be aware that some of the pictures are disturbing because of the nature of the tragedy.

Indonesia's disaster agency official Sutopo Purwo Nugroho tweeted images which he says show debris and personal belongings that came from the aircraft.

The carrier operates with regional partners Thai Lion Air, Malindo Air, Wings Air, Batik Air and Lion Bizjet. "Officer PHE ONWJ perform evacuation and take the documentation".

The head of Indonesia's transport safety committee said he could not confirm the cause of the crash, which would have to wait until the recovery of the plane's black boxes, as the cockpit voice recorder and data flight recorder are known. Relatives and loved ones of the passengers have gathered at the airport in that city.

It has not been officially confirmed how many people were on board.

"The aircraft was commanded by Captain Suneja and co-pilot Harvino with six cabin crew members". You can see a photo from his Facebook page above.

There didn't appear to be much left of the plane.

The plane crashed shortly after takeoff, and it was not yet clear whether there were any survivors.

Lion air rescue
Workers searching through debris from the crashed Lion Air Flight JT 610 off the shore of the Indonesian province of West Java on Monday. Reuters

A telegram from the National Search and Rescue Agency to the air force has requested assistance with the search.

Indonesian Search and Rescue Agency (Basarnas) spokesperson, Yusuf Latif, told News Corporation the aircraft was believed to have crashed near Tanjung Karawang in the waters off West Java.

Indonesian investigators' final report showed a chronically faulty component in a rudder control system, poor maintenance and the pilots' inadequate response were major factors in what was supposed to be a routine flight from the Indonesian city of Surabaya to Singapore.

Vessels searching in the water for the Flight 610 wreckage have found various items of debris. The total number of people on the plane was 189.

Information gathered by the Jakarta Post said that the plane, Lion Air 610, took off from Jakarta at 6.20 a.m. and contact was lost at 6.33 a.m. Earlier this year it confirmed a deal to buy 50 new Boeing narrow-body aircraft worth an estimated $6.24 billion.

Under worldwide rules, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board will automatically assist with the inquiry into Monday's crash, backed up by technical advisers from Boeing.

Lion Air was removed from the European Union's air safety blacklist in June 2016.

Following the crash, Australia's Smart Traveller website advised that Australian government officials and contractors have been instructed not to fly on Lion Air. JT610 was powered by CFM LEAP-1B engines, according to the report.

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