NCAA basketball changes: Undrafted players can return to school

NCAA basketball changes: Undrafted players can return to school | SI.com

"Agents aren't gonna run around and sign guys and spend money for players that they don't think are gonna make it".

This week, we delivered on a promise made just months ago to make profound and meaningful changes to college basketball.

In the past, if a college basketball player declared for the draft, they had until 10 days after the draft combine to return to school.

The agents, who must be certified by the NCAA, can assist players in making informed decisions about turning pro, but can only be hired at the conclusion of a season and have no financial ties to the players aside from small travel and meal expenses related to the draft. Multiple reporters began relaying information about the policy, which allows players to hire an agent, go through the draft process and combine, and return to school if they go undrafted.

ESPN's Jonathan Givony was trying to get to the bottom of the rule changes, and he initially noted some confusion about what was going on.

The NCAA announced several new policies and rules today, including that players will now be allowed to return to school if they declare for the National Basketball Association draft but are not selected. On the other hand, those players will be allowed to take more official visits to campuses, which the schools will pay for. The latter would become effective if the NBA and its players' association allow high school students to enter the draft. The NCAA also suggested that there will be an agreement coming out of talks with apparel companies for "accountability and transparency regarding their involvement in youth basketball".

The rule changes are a part of the NCAA's reforms in response to the college hoops corruption scandal.

University presidents and chancellors will be held "personally accountable" for any rule-breaking by their athletic departments.

No schools were mentioned, but two Federal Bureau of Investigation reports, one in September and another in April, have identified recruiting practices that violate NCAA rules involving prospects who wound up at several schools, including Kansas.

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