Did Sessions mislead Congress about his interactions with Russian Federation?

Trump didn't dismiss idea of Putin meeting

It was revealed earlier this week that Papadopoulos had pleaded guilty to lying to Federal Bureau of Investigation agents about his contacts with a Kremlin-linked professor who boasted that the Russians had "thousands of emails" of dirt on former Democratic presidential candidate Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBlumenthal: Trump-tied data firm reaching out to WikiLeaks "significant" Tillerson eliminates key State Department sanctions office: report Intel Dem: What's in dossier more important than who paid for it MORE.

"He needs to clarify his testimony before our committee", Judiciary Committee member Sen.

Sessions has been quiet on his involvement at the session, despite being asked about it multiple times during several appearances on Capitol Hill.

Last month he reiterated he did not know of any Trump campaign official having contact with Russian officials - a claim Senate Democrats are pushing back on.

In addition to Leahy and Blumenthal, Senators Al Franken (Minn.) and Chuck Schumer (NY) are calling for the attorney general to testify. "He said Sessions did not react or comment one way or the other", Conaway told CNN.

A source familiar with the meeting told Fox News that it "seems clear that the people who remember the conversation believed that Papadopoulos was proposing a prospective idea of using his "Russian contacts" to try to set up a meeting between Trump and Putin, which was immediately rejected by then-Senator Sessions". "I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign and I did not have communications with the Russians".

Following the Post report, Sessions recused himself from the Justice Department's Russian Federation probes - an action that infuriated Trump. However, news reports from March revealed that Sessions had met twice with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in the lead up to the 2016 US presidential election.

Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee, which is also looking into allegations of collusion and Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, also want a reckoning from Sessions.

"What happens if you get a new Attorney General - and the Democrats can't blame the president because they are the ones pushing them out - and then this new guy comes and says, 'Guess what?"

During his January 10 confirmation hearing, Sessions said he was "not aware" of anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign coordinating with the Russian government when asked about such ties by Franken. "He should be honest and disclose all truths, especially when he is under oath or testifying before the United States Congress".

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